Insights From ISA/AAPOS 2018


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Held in March of this year in Washington, D.C., the 2018 annual meeting of the International Strabismological Association and the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus included a variety of lectures, papers, and posters of  interest.

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Here are some highlights (with active hyperlinks preceding each title):

  • The Bielschowsky Lecture – Accommodation and Convergence: Ratios, Linkages, Styles, and Mental Somersaults
  • Paper 3: Impaired Motion Perception in the Fellow Eye of Amblyopic Children is Related to Abnormal Binocular Function
  • Paper 7: Effects of Immersive Virtual Reality Viewing on Young Children: Visuomotor Function, Postural Stability and Visually-Induced Motion Sickness
  • Workshop 17: Reading Difficulties and the Pediatric Ophthalmologist
  • Poster 33: Re-Reading the Same Line in Intermittent Exotropia is Related to the Saccadic Disconjugacy.  (Difficulty of reading is a typical symptom of intermittent exotropia (IXT) and is coupled with re-reading the same line.)
  • Poster 57: Attitudes Concerning Cortical Visual Impairment Among Pediatric Ophthalmologists and Teachers of the Visually Impaired
  • Poster 161: Optic Nerve Morphology in Normal Children: A Validation Study
  • Poster 181: Baltimore Reading and Eye Disease Study (BREDS): Two-Year Results on Compliance with Eyeglass Usage
  • Poster 214: What is Amblyopia? A Primary Care Physician’s Perspective
  • Poster 217: Boston Amblyopia Study 1: Complete Resolution of Subthreshold Amblyopia with Standard Clinical Treatment
  • Poster 218: Boston Amblyopia Study 2: Treatment Outcomes in Patients with Asymmetric, Bilateral Amblyopia
  • Poster 227: Influence of Orthokeratology Lens on Axial length Elongation and Myopic Progression in Childhood Myopia
  • Poster 228: A Three Year Follow-Up Study of Atropine Treatment for Progressive Myopia in Europeans

4 thoughts on “Insights From ISA/AAPOS 2018

  1. Looks like same attitudes on vision and reading! Happy new year to you and your family!! Love Lynn

    On Tue, Sep 11, 2018, 7:48 PM The VisionHelp Blog wrote:

    > Leonard J. Press, O.D., FAAO, FCOVD posted: ” Held in March of this year > in Washington, D.C., the 2018 annual meeting of the International > Strabismological Association and the American Association for Pediatric > Ophthalmology and Strabismus included a variety of lectures, papers, and > posters of int” >

  2. Look at the conclusion – they may yet be able to qualify to attend optometry school…

    Impaired Motion Perception in the Fellow Eye of Amblyopic Children is Related to Abnormal Binocular Function

    Eileen E. Birch, PhD; Reed M. Jost, MS; Yi-Zhong Wang ,PhD; Krista R. Kelly, PhD; Deborah E. Giaschi, PhD
    Retina Foundation of the Southwest, Dallas, TX, Department of Ophthalmology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, Departments of Psychology and Ophthalmology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver

    Introduction: While the clinical focus for amblyopia has been monocular patching to restore visual acuity of the amblyopic eye, recent evidence supports the primary role of binocular dysfunction in amblyopia. Binocular discordance due to strabismus, anisometropia, or both result not only in a monocular visual acuity deficit, but also fellow eye motion perception deficits.1 Here we examine these deficits and their relationship with clinical and sensory factors.

    Methods: 73 amblyopic children (6-12y; 0.2-1.5 logMAR) with strabismus (n=18), anisometropia (n=32), or both (n=23) participated, along with 19 age-similar controls. Performance on a motion-defined form (MDF) task was evaluated in the context of a Star Wars game. The child viewed an array of moving white dots on a black background; dots within a stationary rectangle (‘the enemy spaceship’) moved coherently in one direction, and dots outside moved in the opposite direction. The child’s task was to indicate the orientation of the enemy spaceship. The proportion of coherently moving dots was progressively reduced to determine the minimum coherence needed to perform the task.

    Results: MDF deficits were present in 82% of amblyopic eyes and 21% of fellow eyes. Amblyopic eye MDF deficits correlated with suppression severity (p=0.0001), amblyopic eye visual acuity (p<0.0001), stereoacuity (p<0.0001), and W4 fusion (p<0.0001). Fellow eye MDF deficits correlated with stereoacuity (p=0.0004) and W4 fusion (p=0.002). Children receiving binocular amblyopia treatment had milder fellow eye MDF deficits than children treated with patching (p=0.03).

    Discussion: Fellow eye MDF deficits are common and likely reflect abnormalities in binocular cortical mechanisms that result from early discordant visual experience.

    Conclusion: Binocular amblyopia treatment, which is effective in improving visual acuity,2,3 may also provide a benefit for binocular function.

    References:
    1. Meier K, Giaschi D. Unilateral amblyopia affects two eyes: fellow eye deficits in amblyopia.
    Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2017; 58:1779-1800
    2. Kelly KR, Jost RM, Dao L, Beauchamp CL, Leffler JN, Birch EE. Binocular iPad game vs patching for treatment of amblyopia in children: a randomized clinical trial. JAMA Ophthalmol 2016;134:1402-8.
    3. Birch EE, Li SL, Jost RM, Morale SE, De La Cruz A, Stager D Jr, Dao L, Stager DR Sr Binocular iPad game vs patching for treatment of amblyopia in children: a randomized clinical trial. J AAPOS 2015;19:6-11

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