A serious hidden vision problem – Convergence Insufficiency…revealed with a picture


It has been said, “A picture is worth a thousand words.”

But how do you show with a picture the impact of a vision problem that affects over 20 million people in the US alone, often resulting in stress-related symptoms and unnecessary frustration in reading and learning potential? How do you show with a picture a serious vision condition that often leads to emotional fallout including, anger, anxiety and reduced self-esteem? How do you show with a picture a vision problem that is usually not identified in a standard eye sight vision screening or routine eye examination so those affected may not even realize they have the problem? How do you show with a picture that there is hope, because this condition has been extensively researched and there is a cure?!

How do you show with a picture?

Created in recognition of June as National Convergence Insufficiency Awareness Month,  vision advocacy group, VisionHelp and acclaimed graphics designer Rebecca Sherry tells the story with this picture:

Created by The VisionHelp Group and graphics designer, Rebecca Sherry in recognition of June as National Convergence Insufficiency Awareness Month

 

Dan L. Fortenbacher, O.D. FCOVD

12 thoughts on “A serious hidden vision problem – Convergence Insufficiency…revealed with a picture

    • Thank you Dr. Boulet for asking this question. There are no restrictions (other than don’t modify it) and would not only say “yes” to your request to use this infographic, but we would encouage you to do so. The more that people learn about convergence insufficiency the sooner it will no longer be the “hidden vision problem” that affects so many.

  1. Excellent info graphic. I posted it on our blog with full credit and a link back to Vision Help. This blog is shaping up to be one of the world’s best sources of information on developmental optometry.

  2. I love your blog here.

    We have a 7 1/2 year old boy, whose eyes have considerably deteriorated in lens power. He now wears a -7 (on both eyes).
    We first noticed this when he was 5 (squinting while watching TV).
    He is great in studies, keeps reading all the time and does maths all the time.
    But we are worried about his eyes and are pretty much uncomfortable all mall opticians and eye doctors.

    I am doubting if he’s got CI

    what do you suggest?

    • Amruth,
      Yes, this does not sound like CI. Given that he loves reading and from what you describe is increasing in his nearsightedness prescription, it sounds more like a form of progressive myopia. I would encourage you to find a doctor through http://www.covd.org website. I hope this is helpful to you.
      Dr. Fortenbacher

  3. Dan- Beautiful Poster, possible for the designer to modify slightly to fit into a 8.5X11 sheet, that could be printed, placed into placard at the front desk? Many thanks! Curt

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